BBC micro:bit

€18,95 Incl. tax

BBC micro:bit

Article number: FLF.EDU.MIC.MIC.MICROBITCLASSPACK.SINGLE
Availability: In stock

The BBC micro:bit is a pocket-sized computer that you can code, customise and control to bring your digital ideas, games and apps to life.

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Description
Specifications
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Video
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In Box

The BBC micro:bit is a pocket-sized computer that you can code, customise and control to bring your digital ideas, games and apps to life. Measuring 4cm by 5cm, and designed to be fun and easy to use, users can create anything from games and animations to scrolling stories at school, at home and on the go - all you need is imagination and creativity. The BBC micro:bit is completely programmable. That means each of its LEDs can be individually programmed as can its buttons, inputs and outputs, accelerometer, magnetometer and Bluetooth Smart Technology.

 

Please note: This is just the micro:bit on its own. We also have the BBC micro:bit Go Bundle with USB cable, battery holder and batteries.

  • Microprocessor: 32-bit ARM® Cortex™ M0 CPU
  • A 5x5 LED matrix with 25 red LEDs to light up and can display animiated patterns, scrolling text and alphanumeric characters
  • Two programmable buttons. Use them as a games controller, or control music on a smart phone
  • On-board motion detector or 3-AXIS digital accelerometer that can detect movement e.g. shake, tilt or free-fall
  • A built-in compass, 3D magnetometer to sense which direction you're facing and your movement in degrees
  • Bluetooth® Smart Technology. Connect the micro:bit to other micro:bits, devices, phones, tablets, cameras and other everday objects
  • 20 pin edge connector: This allows the micro:bit to be connected to other devices such as Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Galileo and Kano through a standard connector
  • Micro-USB controller: This is controlled by a separate processor and presents the micro:bit to a computer as a memory stick
  • Five Ring Input and Output (I/O) including power (PWR), ground (GRD) and 3 x I/O
  • System LED x 1 (yellow)
  • System push button switch x 1
  • Read values from sensors and control things like motors or robots


Step 1: Connect It

Connect the micro:bit to your computer via a micro USB cable. Macs, PCs, Chromebooks and Linux systems (including Raspberry Pi) are all supported. It comes with a fun application, give it a try!

Your micro:bit will show up on your computer as a drive called 'MICROBIT'. Watch out though, it's not a normal USB disk!

Step 2: Program It

Using one of our fantastic editors, write your first micro:bit code. For example drag and drop some blocks and try your program on the Simulator in the Javascript Blocks Editor.

Step 3: Download It

Click the Download button in the editor. This will download a 'hex' file, which is a compact format of your program that your micro:bit can read. Once the hex file has downloaded, copy it to your micro:bit just like copying a file to a USB drive. On Windows you can right click and choose "Send To→MICROBIT."

Step 4: Play It

The micro:bit will pause and the yellow LED on the back of the micro:bit will blink while your code is programmed. Once that's finished the code will run automatically!The MICROBIT drive will automatically eject and come back each time you program it, but your hex file will be gone. The micro:bit can only receive hex files and won't store anything else!

What cool stuff will you create? Your micro:bit can respond to the buttons, light, motion, and temperature. It can even send messages wirelessly to other micro:bits using the 'Radio' feature.

Check out the hardware page for more inspiration.

Step 5: Master it

This page shows you how to get started with micro:bit, but as well as JavaScript Blocks you can use Python and text-based JavaScript to program your micro:bit. Head over to the Let's Code page to see the different languages, or check out the ideas page for some things you might like to try out.

1 x BBC micro:bit

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